How To Save Money On Books

At Moolr, we understand that those that write and publish books have put in time and effort to make their book a possibility. To provide you with information and entertainment. Thus we always suggest that you support them where possible. Purchase books when you can. Nevertheless, there are many ways to read on the cheap. And you shouldn’t feel guilt for doing so. We look at how to save money on books.

Join A Library

An obvious starting place, naturally. And it may surprise you that libraries supply way more than just books. They are a great place to rent DVDs or other items that you would rather rent than buy. After all, how many films do you watch more than once? A library, whilst harder to locate nowadays, is free to join. Just ensure you return your items on time! They also provide access to audiobooks and ebooks. 

Buy second hand

What do we require from a book? In simple terms, the words contained within, clearly legible. So does it really matter to you if there is a crease on the cover or the odd page? Not for me. As long as there are no pages missing I am happy. And again, I have rarely read a book more than once, so it does not have to be in perfect condition. I often give away surplus books to charity shops and the like, allowing others to read for a lower price. You can also pick up second hand books from car boot sales, jumble sales and online from places like eBay and Amazon.

Free Kindle books

Even if you don’t own a Kindle, as long as you have a smartphone or tablet you can download the Kindle app. There are plenty of titles given away for free every day, meaning you can load up your library with books for free. As an alternative, you could sign up to Kindle Unlimited. This is worth your while if you are a heavy reader. If not, take the free trial for 30 days, then cancel. If you are, take the trial then pay £7.99 per month thereafter. With Unimited, everything is free apart from the fee -and there are over a million titles to choose from. If audiobooks are more your thing, consider a similar set up with Scribd or Audible. 

Book swaps

I have hundreds of books, and still many to read, but often i will swap a book with friends due to a recommendation. It is a great way to read titles that you may not have known about, and that others say I will like. They are usually right too. If you do borrow a book, ensure you return the favour if they ask to borrow something from your collection. Do remember to return them promptly.

Check Prices

I do have a habit, like many others, when sourcing a book of simply going into Amazon and buying it. I assume it is the cheapest there, and it is convenient and trustworthy. But apart from issues over the morality of using the site, there are many options for buying a book, and possibly cheaper and better options anywhere. When purchasing a book, always do a price check and see where is cheapest. Many other sites may not have a minimum total for free delivery either. 

Enter competitions for books

Many publishers and authors will hold competitions when they have a new book released, giving you a chance to win some new books to enjoy. These competitions can usually be found on their social media channels or websites. join mailing lists too so that you are kept up to date with competitions and offers. If you blog, you may even be able to source free copies if you promise a review. As a football blogger I have received free books this way.

Earn loyalty points

Look out for loyalty points from where you buy your books. Obviously the major supermarkets all have their own loyalty schemes, but even Waterstones does too. 

Sell the books you have read

Once you have finished reading a book you can release some value by selling it on. The resale value of a used book is not great, but it is better than nothing for a book you will not read again and will end up cluttering up your house. And occasionally an out of print book can fetch a hefty price.